Science Friday: Amazing Japanese Satellite Images of the Earth | New study finds heat is being stored beneath the ocean surface | A shape-shifting building material based on pinecones

Japanese satellite image of Earth taken every 10 minutes

Japanese satellite image of Earth taken every 10 minutes

Much higher resolution at the NY Times link below

Japan’s New Satellite Captures an Image of Earth Every 10 Minutes

New study finds heat is being stored beneath the ocean surface

This graph shows the under sea temperature change over the past 20 years

This graph shows the deep sea temperature change over the past 20 years

For much of the past decade, a puzzle has been confounding the climate science community. Nearly all of the measurable indicators of global climate change—such as sea level, ice cover on land and sea, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations—show a world changing on short, medium, and long time scales. But for the better part of a decade, global surface temperatures appeared to level off. The overall, long-term trend was upward, but the climb was less steep from 2003–2012. Some scientists, the media, and climate contrarians began referring to it as “the hiatus.”

If greenhouse gases are still increasing and all other indicators show warming-related change, why wouldn’t surface temperatures keep climbing steadily, year after year? One of the leading explanations offered by scientists was that extra heat was being stored in the .

Now a new analysis by three ocean scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory not only confirms that the extra heat has been going into the ocean, but it shows where. According to research by Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis, and Bill Patzert, the waters of the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean warmed significantly from 2003 to 2012. But the warming did not occur at the surface; it showed up below 10 meters (32 feet) in depth, and mostly between 100 to 300 meters (300 to 1,000 feet) below the sea surface. They published their results on July 9, 2015, in the journal Science.

[…]

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-07-beneath-ocean-surface.html


A shape-shifting building material based on pinecones

July 10, 2015 by Bob Yirka

Chao Chen, a student in the Masters Program at the Royal College of Art in London has come up with a unique building material—a surface that changes its appearance automatically when exposed to water, whether directly, or via humidity. He has told the media that the new material was inspired by pinecones.

Pinecones open when dry and close when wet, to provide optimal conditions for spreading seeds. They do so by simply reacting to water—it seeps into the woody leaves (microsporophylls) and causes them to droop. Inspired by this simple process Chen dissected some cones to see how they were put together and then used what he learned to create objects or coverings that could prove useful or would offer something nice to look at.

http://phys.org/news/2015-07-shape-shifting-material-based-pinecones.html

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