Science Friday: Ancient Reptile with ‘Ridiculously Long Neck’ Unearthed in Alaska | Scientists solve structure of important protein for tumor growth

The long-necked elasmosaur as imagined by Anchorage-based artist James Havens, who is working with Druckenmiller to realistically interpret ancient life forms. Credit: James Havens, courtesy of UAF

The long-necked elasmosaur as imagined by Anchorage-based artist James Havens, who is working with Druckenmiller to realistically interpret ancient life forms.
Credit: James Havens, courtesy of UAF

by Elizabeth Palermo, Associate Editor   |   August 04, 2015 10:41am ET

The fossilized remains of an ancient marine reptile with an extremely long neck and paddlelike appendages were recently uncovered in an unlikely place: the side of a cliff in Alaska. The bones belong to an elasmosaur, an animal that swam the seas about 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period, said Patrick Druckenmiller, earth sciences curator at the University of Alaska Museum of the North. It’s the first time that the skeleton of one of these creatures has been found in the state, he added. “This is a very unusual group of marine reptiles that belongs to a larger group known as plesiosaurs, Druckenmiller told Live Science. “Elasmosaurs are famous because they have these ridiculously long necks and relatively small skulls.”

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http://www.livescience.com/51736-ancient-reptile-fossil-elasmosaur.html


Scientists solve structure of important protein for tumor growth

In a collaborative study between Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and the Argonne National Laboratory, scientists have used a highly specialized X-ray crystallography technique to solve the protein structure of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), important regulators of a tumor’s response to low oxygen (hyopoxia). The findings, published today in the journal Nature, open the door to search for new drugs to treat tumors by cutting off their supply of oxygen and nutrients.

[…]

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-08-scientists-important-protein-tumor-growth.html

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