Science Friday: Why Heat Exhaustion Is so Dangerous | How plants sense electric fields

By Dr. Mercola

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), on average, extreme heat causes 658 deaths in the U.S. each year. This is more than those in tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and lightning combined.1 Sadly, many, if not all, of these deaths are preventable.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reported 2,630 heat illnesses in 2014. These included all conditions related to overheating, such as rhabdomyolysis, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.2

In a study released by the CDC in 2013, researchers found 7,233 heat-related deaths in the U.S. between 1999 and 2009. This data also indicates the numbers are rising.3

In a two-week period in 2012, excessive heat resulted in 32 deaths over four states in the U.S. This is four times the typical average for those same states for the same two-week period between 1999 and 2009.

Just under 70 percent of deaths happen at home and 91 percent of those homes did not have air conditioning. Most of the people who died were either unmarried or living alone.

[…]

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/07/06/heat-exhaustion.aspx


How plants sense electric fields

Date:
July 8, 2016
Source:
Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, JMU
Summary:
An international group of researchers has pinpointed the sensor plants use to sense electric fields. A beneficial side effect: their work could contribute to the understanding of how the Ebola virus enters human cells.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160708082037.htm

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